fbpx
Pillar

Education & Culture

The fourth pillar, education and culture, is built upon the recognition of two essential realities. First, the Western intellectual tradition requires a dedication to and desire for truth. Second, education takes place not only within colleges and universities but within our broader culture, whose institutions and practices form us as whole persons.

Learn more about Education & Culture: get your free eBook today!

Concern about overpopulation is unfounded; rather than implement population control policies, let’s invest in the human person.
A new proposal for reducing unnecessary divorce gets to the heart of the problem: the current system seeks to meet a divorcing couple’s every need—except for time and education on reconciliation.
Rawlsian “public reason” approaches to human capabilities are insufficient bases for social justice.
Private property should be preserved and protected because of its deep contribution to human well-being.
The Supreme Court’s abortion jurisprudence appears to protect a right to abortion even for reasons of sex selection. Yet this gruesome reality might provide an opening for a frontal assault on the premises of Roe v. Wade.
In order to curtail human sex trafficking successfully, we must take seriously that street gangs are a large part of the problem.
The decline of manhood and norms around sex, marriage, and family produces for young women what may in fact have to be endured. But it shouldn't be celebrated.
Modern science does not require us to abandon notions of nature and human nature upon which so much of traditional ethics depends.
Every member of the community has an interest in the quality of the culture that will shape their experiences, their quality of life, and the choices effectively available to them and their children.
The presumptive starting point in the natural law and, more specifically, Christian tradition is one of absolute opposition to intentional killing of beings created in the image of God, for which exceptions must be earned; but the traditional justifications for such exceptions fail.
While not explicitly denying the principle of proportionality, Tollefsen implicitly rejects it, leaving his argument not only counterintuitive but incoherent.
In a new bestseller, David Brooks contends that the “new sciences” point to the incredible reality and importance of old-fashioned things like education, character formation, and virtue.
Religious conversions can be pivotal in turning an inmate away from a life of crime, but only if the process of spiritual transformation continues outside the prison walls.
Pure scientism is insufficient as a basis for criminal justice.
Nothing that a man does can change his nature as man, and so, considered in himself, it will always remain wrong to kill him. This should be the final judgment of practical reason when brought to bear on the question of capital punishment.
Slandering their fathers while energetically progressing “somewhere,” the progressive is always in a position of impiety.
John Locke is a deep cultural well from which we still can draw good water.
Intentional killing is always wrong, and support of capital punishment often stems from a misunderstanding of the nature of human dignity.
Judging from the media’s response to Rick Perry’s Galileo reference in the Reagan debate, our discourse is still governed by the modern view that science and religion can only clash.
New Jersey’s new anti-bullying legislation is misguided and unrealistic, seeking to eliminate conflict rather than resolve it.
What makes September 11th worthy of public memorializing is that it was not only an event in the lives of these individuals and their families; it was an event in the life of the American nation, an attack aimed at the American nation.
A new book argues that flogging may be a more humane, efficient, and just punishment than incarceration.
Presidential candidates in the 2012 election must be prepared to protect the interests of parents and children nationwide by rolling back the progressive education agenda and returning to the states their constitutional power to make decisions about education.
Prejudices of secular and religious groups alike stand in the way of successful crime reduction efforts.

Get your free eBook for The Human Person

"*" indicates required fields

Get your free eBook for Sexuality & Family

Get your free eBook for Politics & Law

Get your free eBook for Education & Culture

Get your free eBook for Business & Economics