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Pillar

Education & Culture

The fourth pillar, education and culture, is built upon the recognition of two essential realities. First, the Western intellectual tradition requires a dedication to and desire for truth. Second, education takes place not only within colleges and universities but within our broader culture, whose institutions and practices form us as whole persons.

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Not everything need be seen as ideological.
Lying, even for laudable reasons, is wrong.
Is lying ever justified?
The pro-life cause must be advanced by truth and by love, and it must be willing to engage in self-criticism when it fails to meet its own exacting standards.
An appreciation for the naturalness of form can lead us back from the politicization of poetry.
The ancient tradition of pursuing knowledge for its own sake is slowly, quietly making a comeback.
A book on the polyamorous community by a “participant observer” provides a window into a weird, confused, and growing world.
The problem with reductionist accounts of life.
When a woman claims to be a man, should the university and the press play along?
Newly defined and vigorously enforced rights have proliferated even as they are uprooted from any philosophic grounding.
An exhibition by contemporary artist Enrique Martínez Celaya at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine (on view through November 23rd) is a unique chance to contrast the uncertainty of our own age with the New Medievalism of the great American architect, Ralph Adams Cram.
It is difficult to speak up and defend certain unpopular truths on today’s college campuses. But it is also urgently needed and greatly rewarding.
Intellectuals have failed to recognize the real character of the Tea Party.
Social conservatives must understand and embrace America’s traditional economic culture before they can contribute to its renewal. Economic conservatives must expel the infection of shallow anthropology, vulgar utilitarianism, and metaphysical blindness that they picked up from progressivism in the 20th century.
Accepting the “liberal” definition on pregnancy can actually help clarify the morality of contraception, abortion, and embryo adoption.
Women are hard-wired for relationships—and a woman’s relationship to her baby is one of the most powerful of all, whether she realizes it or not. The hard-wiring of the brain may explain many women’s disturbing post-abortion feelings.
Liberal intolerance is rooted in a secular disregard for the dignity of individuals, coupled with the veneration of Progress and the belief that liberal ideologies can’t win in public debate.
Scientists have begun to doubt whether there was a “Big Bang.” But in claiming that this disproves the existence of a Creator, they confuse temporal beginnings with origins.
Civility is at the foundation of democratic society, but our educational institutions have lost their manners and the grace of gentility.
Under the new health-care law, pro-lifers may have to accept inferior health plans, rather than wrongly pay into abortion providing ones.
An adapted commencement address arguing that traditional building provides us with a durable and beautiful built environment, which in turn provides the best physical and spatial context for the inventiveness and daring that modern life demands.
Our failure to engage in substantive political debate can tempt us to write our opponents out of the political community.
The fiftieth anniversary of oral contraceptives is a reminder of all the things the Pill lets us forget.
The recent SEC scandal reminds us of the prevalence of pornography. Steve Jobs’ decision to ban pornography on the iPhone might provide a way forward.

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