Monthly Archives: April 2009


 

by on April 28th, 2009

The recent publication of the Torture Memos and of the International Red Cross report on the treatment of high-level detainees in the aftermath of 9/11 has returned to national prominence the discussion of the morality of torture and “enhanced interrogation” techniques. It is important to be clear, as a moral matter, on what boundaries should be accepted in interrogation of human beings; a responsible and non-politicized discussion is essential on this difficult issue.

by on April 24th, 2009

The Iowa court’s recent decision does not simply broaden marriage, it radically changes its nature. While marriage previously served public purposes of attaching mothers and fathers to their children and one another, now marriage merely serves as affirmation of adult feelings.

by on April 21st, 2009

Faced with Charles Murray’s argument that the welfare state makes everything too easy, a socialist could ask: Should everything therefore be made more difficult? How can Murray say the welfare state is bad for making life easier while praising other state functions that make life easier, like the police? Only a moral perspective can oppose socialism while affirming legitimate state functions.

by on April 17th, 2009

Public transit and walkable neighborhoods are necessary for the creation of a country where families and communities can flourish.

by on April 14th, 2009

Higher education exposes ingratiating talk as the counterfeit of teaching; rote learning as the counterfeit of thought; mere opinion as the counterfeit of judgment; enthusiasm as the counterfeit of principle.

by on April 7th, 2009

The Supreme Court of Iowa’s decision to redefine marriage abandons reason and replaces it with feelings as the standard of public consensus.

by on April 3rd, 2009

The Constitution’s no-establishment rule does protect the liberty of religious conscience, but not in the way, or ways, that we usually think.

In Depth: Islam and Immigration

Agree or disagree with Donald Trump's approach to Islamic immigration, the United States must come to terms with such immigration's cultural and demographic implications.


  • by Joseph G. Trabbic on February 9, 2017

    On Thomistic principles, Trump’s ban on Syrian refugees whose lives are in danger is not morally justifiable. Bans on other travelers and immigrants, however, are not as problematic.

  • by Robert Carle on February 21, 2017

    President Trump’s executive order on immigration is deeply troubling, because it inflicts suffering on “the least of these” for political gain. This demeans the office of the President and robs the United States of its moral high ground in the War on Terror.

  • by Joseph G. Trabbic on August 22, 2016

    Is there a moral obligation for the US not to enact Donald Trump’s proposed ban on Muslim travel into the US?

  • by Luma Simms on March 10, 2016

    Our nation faces an assimilation crisis as many Middle Eastern immigrants reject our culture, which they perceive as libertine. We could improve the situation through a renewed commitment to our founding principles, particularly the reunification of faith and reason.

  • by Robert Carle on October 29, 2015

    A best-selling new novel taps into an angst that has become an obsession in Europe.

  • by Luca Volontè on December 17, 2015

    Europe can only emerge from its downward spiral by putting religious faith and respect for history and tradition at the center of our communal and personal lives.


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