by on November 18th, 2014

Parenthood powerfully combats the two greatest dangers to a democracy: selfishness and isolation.

by on September 30th, 2014

The anti-slavery arguments of American abolitionists demonstrate the way in which Lockean natural rights and Thomistic natural law can be reconciled.

by on May 9th, 2014

To view practical agreements between Aristotelian-Thomist foundationalists and contemporary anti-foundationalist liberals as “progress” is to fiddle while Rome burns.

by on March 27th, 2014

As a philosopher, Locke was both historically great and uniquely ambivalent. This combination provides extraordinarily fertile ground for uniting modern and pre-modern insights that seem opposed.

by on March 26th, 2014

Our modern intellectual context is profoundly at odds with genuine Aristotelian-Thomism. If we want to infuse the public discourse with sound philosophy, we must soberly recognize the obstacles before us and confront them in the spirit of devotion to truth. The first of a two part series.

by on August 1st, 2013

The layman’s understanding of the world can’t be considered mere guesswork—it’s the necessary starting point for understanding reality.

by on June 12th, 2013

Darwin rejected a theory of knowledge that best accords with the common experience of the expert and the layman: a process of induction or intuition whereby sense impressions become memories, and memories become experience.

by on May 29th, 2013

Darwin’s evolutionary theory rests on a problematic premise: Our senses don’t tell us the truth about nature.

by on March 12th, 2013

When intellectual arguments against abortion fail to persuade, recourse must be had to images and strategies that awake what David Hume considered our “moral sense.”

by on September 19th, 2012

Governments don’t legally recognize a certain type of relationship because they are suckers for romance; they do so because they are understandably afraid of the potentially destructive consequences of such romance.