Monthly Archives: December 2011


 

by on December 21st, 2011

In his new book, George McGovern refuses to acknowledge his role in fusing a Democratic coalition of lifestyle liberals and the public costs this has entailed.

by on December 20th, 2011

Meet the academics who try to redefine pedophilia as “intergenerational intimacy.”

by on December 19th, 2011

The absolute prohibition of intrinsically evil acts is the limit on one’s positive obligations.

by on December 16th, 2011

Divine legislation functions to enforce moral absolutes, not to ground them.

by on December 15th, 2011

If tradition is not a good reason to limit marriage to a man and a woman, it is also not a good reason to limit it to only two people.

by on December 14th, 2011

Though racial and religious profiling offends our better feelings, it is nevertheless constitutional.

by on December 13th, 2011

If appeals to God get ruled out, either by disbelief in his existence or reluctance to rely upon it, then it isn’t possible to demonstrate that there are moral absolutes.

by on December 12th, 2011

Rather than simply denouncing Truman for his decision to employ the atomic bomb, his critics need to confront the harsh reality of war and seriously consider the lack of viable alternatives available to him.

by on December 9th, 2011

The eurozone’s current crisis is an opportunity for Europe to explore new monetary options that challenge the hitherto dominant vision of the European Union’s economic future.

by on December 8th, 2011

Freedom of religion means the right of religious persons, groups, and ideas to participate fully and equally in the life of the community and in the marketplace of ideas.

by on December 7th, 2011

Family law has changed during the past 50 years to the detriment of child well-being, paving the way for the arguments in support of same-sex marriage. But there is a new strategy available to us to respond to this situation. The second in a two-part series.

by on December 6th, 2011

The Supreme Court was more right than it knew during the past two centuries as it identified the state’s interest in marriage as children and their formation. The first in a two-part series.

by on December 5th, 2011

Judges and legal scholars rarely agree on what was the original meaning, understanding, or intent behind the Establishment Clause. Donald Drakeman’s book Church, State, and Original Intent critiques current views and offers a new approach.

by on December 2nd, 2011

True solitude is the contemplation of the true, the good, and the beautiful, and such solitude is essential to maintaining communities of friendship oriented towards non-quantifiable goods.

by on December 1st, 2011

The tradition of common morality does not permit us to excuse the atomic bomb as a “necessary” evil.

In Depth: Islam and Religious Freedom

What is the status of religious freedom in Islam, and what are its prospects?


  • by Jennifer S. Bryson on June 20, 2016

    True religious freedom demands that we allow space in our society for difference, even when we don’t understand the reasons for a particular religious practice. Having to live without fully understanding others comes with the territory of genuine diversity.

  • by Thomas F. Farr on September 23, 2011

    The advancement of international religious freedom is crucial for terrorism’s defeat.

  • by Abdullah Saeed on June 29, 2011

    As the call for freedom advances in Muslim-majority countries, we have good reason to be optimistic that religious freedom will increase as well.

  • by Mustafa Akyol on July 1, 2011

    With extremism losing momentum, there is hope that the Muslim Middle East is beginning once again to embrace the liberalism of early 20th-century Islam.

  • by Michael Novak on June 27, 2011

    By the year 2020, the Islamic nations of the Mediterranean Basin will resound with positive cries for democracy, human rights, individual liberty, and the dignity of every man, woman, and child.

  • by Daniel Philpott on January 30, 2017

    What is the status of religious freedom in Islam, and what are its prospects? An answer to this question must begin with a nuanced appraisal of the political theologies that govern different Muslim nations. The first in a two-part series.

  • by Daniel Philpott on January 31, 2017

    Contrary to what one often hears in Western media, Islam needs neither a Reformation nor an Enlightenment. Islam must—and can—find resources from within its tradition to defend the full human right to religious freedom. The second in a two-part series.


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